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Posts Tagged ‘Phase transition’

Finally, Science is Doing Something Useful!

April 5, 2011 1 comment

Photo Credit: Aaron Logan

I love coffee. It has lots of flavour nuance (yes, I actually said nuance) and my brain loves stimulants.

But here’s the problem. I come into work in the morning, and I get a coffee. It is too hot to drink at first, so I let it sit for a few minutes.

However, after reading a few emails I get distracted and forget about my poor coffee. By the time I remember it, which is usually about an hour later, it is far too cold.

So I take it to the microwave to heat it up. However, it gets too hot, so I have to let it sit for a few minutes.

And the cycle goes on. It is definitely one of our #firstworldproblems, but it annoys me nonetheless.

But behold! The Coffee Temperature Regulating Thing-a-ma-jig!

The Coffee Joulie

Actually they are called Coffee Joulies, and they even have a Kickstarter page to raise some money to get the business up and running.

So how do they actually work? Each stainless steel “joulie” contains a material which melts at 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 degrees Celsius). If the coffee is hotter than this, the material absorbs thermal energy by undergoing a phase change (melting). This helps cool the coffee down faster. Once the temperature of the coffee dips below 140, the material remains slightly hotter than that until it solidifies, which keeps the coffee hotter, longer.

And no, I am in no way affiliated with these two guys who started this company, and I have no financial interest in the product. I just think it is an interesting solution to a common problem, and the solution is elegant in its simplicity.