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Posts Tagged ‘internet’

Canadians are the World’s Biggest Net-Nerds

March 9, 2011 2 comments

A report released yesterday by ComScore has found that Canadians spend more time online, about 43.5 hours per month in 2010, than any other country! Hurray!

The United States was second with 35.3 hours per month, followed by the UK with 32.3.

Some other notable statistics were that there was a 12% growth in Canadian users in the age group of 55+ in 2010 compared to 2009. Keeping in touch with the grandkids I guess.

And while traffic to Social Networking sites like Twitter and Facebook went up 13%, visitors to blogs went down by 9%.

C’mon people, close down your TweetDeck and drive up the site stats on my blog would ya?

I’m not really sure if Canadians should be proud of this or not. Does this mean we are the most tech-savvy of all nations, or that we have nothing better to do?

Of course it does get pretty cold up here in the winter time, so I’d rather be watching stuff on YouTube than braving the -25C weather in Calgary. That’s nothing to be ashamed of, right?

The Adventure of Links: Feb. 19, 2011

February 19, 2011 Leave a comment

Since I’ve been slacking on my links, this will be a big one. Within you will find that sex in space would be tricky, a statue of Robocop, thundersnow, proof of “unintelligent design” and a genetically modified jalapeno.

Physics/Astronomy

Tesla vs. Edison Mad Lib. Yes, you read that correctly.

A biopic about Einstein is in the works.

Scientists smash giant granite balls together to simulate asteroid impacts (w/video)

Its been 10 years since Fox tried to convince people the moon landing was a hoax. Fox has not improved much in the last decade.

Learn physics from an NFL cheerleader. Science rules!

How Vikings navigated using crystals and polarized light.

Health

Gonorrhea has human DNA

How long is a severed head conscious for?

Why beer batter is better for fish and chips.

You mean Nutella isn’t really healthy? Whaaa?

Sugary soda may increase efficiency of brain activity.

A jalapeno genetically altered to hold more cream cheese for jalapeno poppers. I feel fatter already.

Fun/Funny

Fantasy casting posters re-imagine classic sci-fi films. Tim Curry as the Joker? Weird…

Ancient humans used skulls as goblets. Mmmmmm…

The Angry Birds finally settle their disagreements.

Detroit to erect a statue of Robocop.

The mystery of which Cubs game Ferris Bueller went to has been solved!

Lions and Tigers playing with an iPad.

A piece of cake from Charles and Diana’s royal wedding sold at auction. Some people have WAY too much money.

Winston Churchill’s false teeth sold at auction. Seriously, TOO MUCH MONEY!

Sexy Stuff

Space sex would be tricky, says NASA.

Best Science headline I’ve read in a while: Two Timing Spacecraft has Date with Another Comet (w/video)

Why girls moan during sex. Sorry guys, turns out we aren’t THAT good….

Folk Myth : Can shoe size predict penile length?

Post Orgasmic Illness Syndrome. Yes, it’s a real thing.

Girls like monkey sex. Literally.

Internet/Technology

Internet users more likely to volunteer

New device uses EM pulses to detonate IEDs from a safe distance.

A robot that can hear you breathing. Through walls.

Want to have a confession but don’t want to talk to an actual priest? There’s an app for that.

Amazon adds real page numbers to the Kindle.

Mexican cops seize a home-made marijuana hurling catapult near U.S. – Mexico border.

We’ve run out of IP addresses! Run!

Nature

Japanese researchers plan to resurrect the Woolly Mammoth in 5 years. Don’t get your hopes up.

The essentials of bear hibernation

Natural selection limits how many attractive males can exist in a population

The mystery of how fleas jump has been solved.

Thundersnow. What else needs to be said?

Polar bear swims 9 days straight.

Skepticism

An explanation for why people hold on to irrational fears.

In India, Astrology is a science. I know, right? *FACEPALM*

Filmmaker psychs out psychics and ET believers.

External testicles prove “unintelligent design”.

Video Abstracts in a Physics Journal

February 16, 2011 Leave a comment

The New Journal of Physics, which is an open-access journal from the Institute of Physics, has started to allow authors to submit video abstracts with their papers.

This is really cool because it gives authors a chance to explain their work in a more accessible and detailed way. Video abstracts are allowed to be up to 4 minutes long. That may not seem like much, but when you compare it to trying to fit all the important details of your paper in a 200 word abstract, it is really an eternity.

Besides the advantage for the authors, people like you and me can watch the videos and get a better understanding of what the paper is about. This is particularly useful if the subject is not in your field of expertise.

Researchers are already saying how much they think this is a good idea

‘Research is a human journey. The internet was invented to bring human beings together. To meet a researcher through an internet video is to be part of this adventure. New Journal of Physics is a high-quality journal at the forefront of current physics discoveries. NJP video abstracts humanize this journey somehow.’
Germain Rousseaux, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, France (Rousseaux et al2010 New J. Phys.12095018)

I can’t embed any videos on a free WordPress blog (I might get my domain soon so I can do stuff like that), but here is what a reference page looks like with a video abstract.

Science and the internet. A perfect match.

Why I Was Almost Late for Work Today

February 14, 2011 Leave a comment

Oh xkcd. How is it that you are so intuitive to my daily life?

Sometimes in the morning I just don’t move very fast.

Now to be fair, I did go to the gym around 6:30, showered and then sat at the computer to check emails and so forth. Then of course I check on my blog and see the comments to my recent post about water fluoridation in Calgary.

I just find it really interesting that I simply can’t help myself. I HAVE to immediately check people’s references, quotes and basically do fact checking. It sounds so unexciting, yet I just couldn’t wait until after work to do it.

Luckily though, a road along my bus route which was closed, opened today and made traffic run much smoother. Couple that with the bus arriving just as I walk up to my bus stop, and I actually got to work earlier than usual, despite leaving later than I should have.

I guess the scientific gods (?) were smiling upon me today.

Egyptian Crisis Explained using Indiana Jones

February 2, 2011 1 comment

As explained on Moviefone, @furrygirl has devised a way to explain the Egyptian crisis to Americans, or those who simply need a more visual and familiar medium to understand the underlying causes of the unrest there.

Good stuff.

Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer? See What a Real Expert Says

November 24, 2010 6 comments

I’ve written about the issue of cell phones and Wi-Fi and the supposed health risks associated with their use. The resounding scientific evidence shows they are perfectly safe, but the media continues to stoke fear in the public with unbalanced coverage.

When reading a news story about this sort of thing, I always wonder why they don’t ask an actual expert. The answer is that an expert would say how implausible the story is, and that they are silly for reporting it.

That doesn’t sell newspapers.

Instead, they find the one person on the fringe who maintains that there is a magical mechanism by which non-ionizing radiation can harm us. But thankfully, Phil Plait posted on his blog today something I have been looking for a long time.

I’m not a researcher (anymore). I don’t have a Ph.D, so I can tell you what I think, and I can tell you I know what I’m talking about, but I will never have as much credibility as a real university professor in physics or electrical engineering.

Enter this talk by Professor Christopher Davis from the University of Maryland’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. It was given at a National Capitol Area Skeptics meeting, and posted on YouTube. It’s in 5 parts and each part is about 13 minutes long.

It is a fascinating talk and not too technical, so you don’t need a science background to understand the main points. He even touches on backscatter x-ray scanners which have been in the news quite a bit lately. Enjoy!

Happy Halloween!

October 31, 2010 1 comment

Here are a few things to be afraid of today:

1. The WiFi hysteria in Ontario is still going on, despite an overwhelming scientific consensus that WiFi is perfectly safe.

2. While its fun to go to movies about the paranormal, it seems actual belief in the supernatural may be getting even more common.

3. Christopher Walken reading Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven”. (Thanks to Zee’s Wordly Obsessions for bringing this video to my attention).