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Video Abstracts in a Physics Journal

February 16, 2011 Leave a comment

The New Journal of Physics, which is an open-access journal from the Institute of Physics, has started to allow authors to submit video abstracts with their papers.

This is really cool because it gives authors a chance to explain their work in a more accessible and detailed way. Video abstracts are allowed to be up to 4 minutes long. That may not seem like much, but when you compare it to trying to fit all the important details of your paper in a 200 word abstract, it is really an eternity.

Besides the advantage for the authors, people like you and me can watch the videos and get a better understanding of what the paper is about. This is particularly useful if the subject is not in your field of expertise.

Researchers are already saying how much they think this is a good idea

‘Research is a human journey. The internet was invented to bring human beings together. To meet a researcher through an internet video is to be part of this adventure. New Journal of Physics is a high-quality journal at the forefront of current physics discoveries. NJP video abstracts humanize this journey somehow.’
Germain Rousseaux, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, France (Rousseaux et al2010 New J. Phys.12095018)

I can’t embed any videos on a free WordPress blog (I might get my domain soon so I can do stuff like that), but here is what a reference page looks like with a video abstract.

Science and the internet. A perfect match.

Whats Better Than a Wine Cellar? 180 Feet of Baltic Sea

July 19, 2010 Leave a comment

I like wine. I drink it often.

Can’t say I’ve ever had a very old wine though. Mostly I just buy whatevers on sale at the Co-Op.

But something really cool happened to a case of champagne that may have belonged to King Louis XVI.

A team of Swedish divers found, in an abandoned shipwreck in the Baltic Sea, a case of 30 bottles of Veuve Clicquot, a very fancy brand of champagne. The pitch darkness and lack of oxygen preserved the champagne perfectly. Sweet.

That makes it roughly 230 years old. By far the oldest bottle of (drinkable) champagne in the world.

230 year old bottle of Veuve Clicquot

Evidently, if the bottles truly did belong to King Louis XVI, they could each be worth a few million dollars at auction.

The location of the wreck is being held secret, and only one bottle has been brought to the surface. As for how it tastes, “There’s a lot of tobacco, but also grape and white fruits, oak and mead,”

I dunno about you, but I can never taste anything that the label says the wine is supposed to taste like. Think I need a wine tasting lesson.