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Posts Tagged ‘astronomy’

Time-Lapse Auroras and Flyovers

September 29, 2011 Leave a comment

Sometimes capturing things on video is the only way to truly express their beauty and magnificence.

And sometimes, its the only way to express the extent of their AWESOME!

This time-lapse video shows how circling the planet looks from the International Space Station:

The next one is a time-lapse of an aurora (my fav, as you all know) over Finland:

Aurora Borealis in Finnish Lapland 2011 from Flatlight Films on Vimeo.

The awesome is just…too much sometimes :)

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Awe Arousing Appearance of Aurora

September 17, 2011 Leave a comment

I love aurorae. Possibly one of the most beautiful and spectacular natural phenomena to grace this planet.

Astronaut Ron Garan recently posted a fantastic photo of an aurora from Earth’s orbit on his Twitter feed:

One of the last pictures I took #FromSpace #Aurora - southern lights - dancing with #Orion 9/14/11 18:48 GMT

Makes me feel like a 9 year old kid again, wishing he could be an astronaut when he grows up.

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REMINDER: This blog is moving! The new location is http://www.aquantumofknowledge.com/ 

Remember to update your subscriptions! This site will no longer be supported after September 30, 2011. 

Thanks! 

Ryan

Last Shuttle Launch and A Comet Across the Sun’s Bow

July 8, 2011 Leave a comment

Some cool stuff happening in and around space these last couple days.

This video from the Solar Dynamics Observatory shows a comet streaking across the face of the Sun!!

And of course, the final shuttle launch EVER happened earlier today.

Screen grab of video from NASA website.

Moon Motion Movie Madness!

June 15, 2011 Leave a comment

Alliteration is fun.

Anywhooo…a lot of people know that only one side of the moon faces the Earth. That is because the moon rotates on its axis at roughly the same rate that it orbits the Earth.

The side of the moon which faces away from the Earth is commonly referred to as the Dark Side of the Moon (also one of the best album’s of all time).

In actuality, through the course of a year we see about 59% of the Moon’s surface. That is because the moon tilts and wobbles a bit, so sometimes we get a little more moon for our buck.

This video by the Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio shows one whole year of moon motion in a 2.5 minute time lapse video.

Pretty cool stuff!

Also, don’t forget to check out today’s Google Doodle, which is a nifty little animation showing today’s total lunar eclipse.

 

Astronomy Headline #Fail!

June 15, 2011 Leave a comment

The story fails to mention that ALL total lunar eclipses occur during a full moon.

Thanks to Phil Plait for pointing this out, further proving the usefulness of Twitter.

Categories: Astronomy, News Tags: , , , , ,

Big-Ass Explosion on the Sun

June 8, 2011 Leave a comment

A magnificent solar flare erupted from the Sun yesterday.

Here’s a really cool video put together at Helioviewer.org in the UV range. (Watch it in HD for the full ‘KABOOM!’ effect)

No More Tears in Heaven

May 25, 2011 Leave a comment
File:Astronaut-EVA.jpg

Photo: NASA/JPL

Drew Feustel, an astronaut currently in space with the crew of the Space Shuttle Endeavour, had a small problem with his spacewalk on Wednesday.

Some anti-fog solution he had rubbed onto his visor started to flake off during the spacewalk. Since the anti-fog solution is really just dish soap, it caused a problem because it flaked off into his eye.

If you have ever gotten soap in your eye, you know its terrible, terrible sting.

Aside: I used to put dish soap on my glasses when I played hockey so they wouldn’t fog up. I didn’t realize this was a “space-age” solution.

So poor Drew’s eyes started to water. But because of the lack of gravity, the tears would not fall down, they just sort of hung around on his eyeball.

“Tears in space don’t run down your face,” he said, according to lead spacewalk officer Allison Bollinger

“They actually kind of conglomerate around your eyeball,” Bollinger recounted.

Eventually, he was able to rub his eye on a device inside his helmet to release the fluid from the surface of his eye.

So disaster averted. This indeed sounds like one of the ultimate #firstworldproblems